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Imagine that

By Lisa Fabrizio
web posted September 24, 2007

Is it any coincidence that the two entities American liberals probably hate most are organized religion and our military? Liberal groups like Moveon.org run ads disparaging military men of honor like General David Petraeus while folks like the ACLU and the "Reverend" Barry Lynn have made the elimination of God in public their life's work.

But what do these groups have in common? While they all preach a gospel of socialism, secularism and sexual worship, the main driving force behind those who denigrate our military and religious practices is egotism. They just can't wrap their minds around the concept that there is something bigger than themselves.

Soldiers, sailors and airmen voluntarily risking their lives for others and even worse, Catholic nuns and priests throwing away their lives by consecrating them to God and their fellow men--to the extent that they are willing to forgo the one, true purpose of life: sex--must seem the acme of insanity to leftist naval gazers.

To them and their way of thinking, the notion that "greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends," is an incomprehensibility. Religious and military vocations have discipline and obedience at their core; an odious combination for those of the Me Generation of the 1960's. It's not difficult to see why the ‘never trust anyone over thirty' crowd has always been scandalized by this.

Having spurned the authority of their parents and responsibility for their country's defense, the next steps on the road to Utopia were a snap. For them, police officers were "pigs," God was dead and our armed personnel were reduced to being merely the murderous arm of the shadowy, "military-industrial complex."  

And they oddly felt that this was for the good of the country. Much of this continues today. Indeed, their current attitude is reflected in a saying of their idol, Ho Chi Minh: "It was patriotism, not Communism, that inspired me."

Whether or not they truly believed all of this or if their conceit made it so, is known only to them. But what is known is that their embrace of Communism, at a time when the proponents of this benign system were the greatest threats to our nation's security simply sealed the deal. For them, the belief that God watched over a country that deserved defending, was and continues to be passé.

All of this can be summed up by the vacuous and insipid lyrics of John Lennon's "Imagine," the opening notes of which still send graying hippies and their progeny into ecstasy. So popular is its socialistic, yet sugar-coated message, that fellow traveler Jimmy Carter has said that "In many countries around the world you hear [it] used almost equally with national anthems."

This dreaming of a dreary existence without heaven, hell, religion, countries and especially "nothing to kill or die for" sums it all up nicely. The fact Lennon himself admitted that it was, "virtually the Communist Manifesto" has not diminished its continuing influence on modern-day America .

Yet we can see the similarities between Lennon-- a millionaire "tax exile" from the UK who asked us to "imagine no possessions"--and certain current lefties who hector us on the evils of energy consumption while jetting around the world in the process of doing so.

Summing up the Utopian ideal, Mahatma Gandhi once said, "What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans, and the homeless whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty and democracy?" Fortunately for us, the majority in this country recognize the difference and thankfully still outnumber those who most certainly do not.
 
But modern leftists carry on the egoistic mantra of Lennon and friends. And their disdain for out military and religion might be explained in the lyric from another song from the dreadful "Imagine" album:

Well, I don't wanna be a churchman mama, I don't wanna cry;
Well, I don't wanna be a soldier mama, I don't wanna die. ESR

Lisa Fabrizio is a columnist who hails from Connecticut. You may write her at mailbox@lisafab.com.

 

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