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The Women’s March and the real Deplorables

By Selwyn Duke
web posted January 30, 2017

In a recent viral Facebook post, a conservative woman found it necessary to point out that she wasn’t a “disgrace to women” for not supporting the Women’s March on Washington. Of course not. Saying otherwise is a bit like having called a soldier a disgrace to soldiers for not having supported the My Lai Massacre.

One DC marcher held a placard stating, “I am more than my v****a.” This was clear: She was also a mouth and a sign.

British journalist Katie Hopkins, who attended the event, cited the above message and pointed out that possession of such an anatomical feature “is a matter of biology, not a political argument” — and that the marchers had no political arguments. Theirs was a collective tantrum.

Madonna spoke at the rally, dropped f-bombs, led the throng in chanting "I'M NOT YOUR B****!" and then, quite ironically, complained that “Good” didn’t win in the election. Hopkins quipped that she didn’t “even know Good was a candidate.” If he was, though, Madonna should have told us whether Donald Trump is the Bad or the Ugly. Then we’d better know what to expect the next four years.

But Madonna, don’t preach; you’re in trouble deep. It’s not just that the Secret Service is now investigating her for saying at the march that she thought about "blowing up the White House." It’s that she’s blowing up her own life and helped blow up our culture.

After peddling sexuality to make money and demonstrating a pathological unwillingness to constrain herself, Madonna has (as a parent must) tried to constrain her children. Unsurprisingly, however, son Rocco Ritchie rebelled against the immaterial girl and now lives with his father.

The 58-year-old pop tart has also become the Peter Pan Syndrome personified and is clearly unhappy, as 2016 on-stage meltdowns evidenced. Is this woman, whose own ship is listing badly, one to advise on the ship of state? Madonna, take the log out of your own eye before worrying about the speck in Donald Trump’s.

Actress Ashley Judd spoke at the rally as well (and as badly). Perhaps now too dependent on having others write her material, she recited a poem disgorged by a 19-year-old Dunkin’ Donuts worker which included the line, “I feel Hitler in these streets, a mustache traded for a toupee.” What profundity! Move over, Whitman and Yeats — you’ve just been dunked on.

In the same vein, there were march messages such as "This p***y bites and she slays," “P***y power — it’ll grab ya’,” “B*****s get stuff done” (finally, some specificity!), “Ovaries before brovaries,” “My p***y bites,” “Utereses before duderuses” (so obsessed with sexual body parts but can’t spell them?), and “Trump is a big p***y.” They forgot to say he smells and has cooties.

These were, mind you, among 150 slogans provided for protesters to choose from because, well, no one could ascend to such heights of intellectualism all by himself.

Additionally, many marchers wore pink “p***y hats,” which, Yahoo.com stated, would “Unite Millions at Women’s Marches Around the World.” If men held a rally and wore doggy hats with phallic symbolism, would they be called brave or boorish, be exalted as protesters or excoriated as pigs?

The march was pointless, classless and brainless, but not harmless. One common theme was anger at certain crass comments Trump made in the past. To combat this, the march’s leaders and their lemmings decided to be crude, lewd and even more crass in the present. It’s much like trying to correct your child’s cursing by cursing him out.

A famous sentiment used to justify such behavior, and one written on a protester’s sign, stated, "Well behaved women seldom make history.” This is like complaining that well behaved children seldom make a mess, for empowered ill-behaved people often do make history — and make a mess of it.

Contrary to this was the father of our nation, George Washington. He defeated his time’s greatest power and won our nation’s independence, all while being a pillar of civility. Not only is he known for helping popularize 110 “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior,” but in 1776 he issued general orders to the Continental Army condemning the practice of “profane cursing,” writing that every man of “character…detests and despises it.”

Seeking rights without character is like seeking health without nourishment. Washington himself observed, "Human rights can only be assured among a virtuous people” while fellow founder Samuel Adams warned that “public liberty will not long survive the total extinction of morals." The DC vixens-cum-vice peddlers should take note.

Fortunately, there are millions more women making history by, every day, molding the next generation to be well behaved — and to not mistake boorishness for bravery and sexual snake oil for sophistication. ESR

Contact Selwyn Duke, follow him on Twitter or log on to SelwynDuke.com.

 

 

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